Fast and the furious: Tokyo Drift

Growing up, I have witnessed already 5 different movies of Fast and the furious. One of them being Fast and the Furious Tokyo Drift. The movie itself demonstrated many different examples of yellow peril. When I first watched the movie, I didn’t think much about it other than it had a lot of Asians in it and the cars looked cool. But now that I am currently enrolled in this course, It has expanded my thinking and I now realize that whole movie is stereotyping Asian/Asian Americans. What I mean by stereotyping, is that even till this current day my belief about Asians is that they get cheap cars and fix them up to look cool and drive fast and race them. The entire movie portrayed Yellow peril in a number of ways.

There were two groups of asians, one group were the bad guys that stole car parts and cars and other valuable items. The other group used to be apart of the bad group until they had a change of heart because of the guilty feeling one group member had. I would almost have to say that the group member was slowly becoming a Implicit Yellow face because he no longer wanted to be seen as an asian who all he did was race and steal cars. He no longer wanted to be recognized as a dangerous person who everyone feared in Tokyo.

Furthermore, the white guy named Ryan who moved to Tokyo because he was too much of  liability in America was one of the only white people in Tokyo. He was seen as an outsider. Essentially, as time moved on and Ryan started to get more and more comfortable with living in Tokyo. He met one of the “bad group members” sister and fell for her almost instantly. Eventually the brother who was the leader of the bad Asian group became defensive because Ryan was an outsider and their beliefs were that no one gets involved with outsiders. This example demonstrated a act of Xenophobia, which means a hatred or fear of outsiders.

I couldn’t help but analyze the situation and ask if that was a fear of an outsider or was he just being plain racist because he was a different ethnicity from them?

Even though this movie portrayed the stereotype that most people believe about asians, my opinion is that every race has their niche. Whether you are white, black, asian or mexican; every race has their skill set and are known for something. Who cares if asians like to build cars up and race them, if thats what they love to do then great. Does it matter if black people like music or play sports? No, so my point is if you enjoy doing something then do it. Don’t let everyone else’s opinion determine your happiness.

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4 thoughts on “Fast and the furious: Tokyo Drift

  1. Hi Nicholas–Terrific analysis of the different characters in these films in relation to Asian/Asian American representations. Justin Lin (the director) has tried to resist some of the stereotypical representations, but you raise some good points about how the movies still reflect the controlling images.

    Kathy

  2. Growing up, I have witnessed already 5 different movies of Fast and the furious. One of them being Fast and the Furious Tokyo Drift. The movie itself demonstrated many different examples of yellow peril. When I first watched the movie, I didn’t think much about it other than it had a lot of Asians in it and the cars looked cool. But now that I am currently enrolled in this course, It has expanded my thinking and I now realize that whole movie is stereotyping Asian/Asian Americans. What I mean by stereotyping, is that even till this current day my belief about Asians is that they get cheap cars and fix them up to look cool and drive fast and race them. The entire movie portrayed Yellow peril in a number of ways.

    There were two groups of asians, one group were the bad guys that stole car parts and cars and other valuable items. The other group used to be apart of the bad group until they had a change of heart because of the guilty feeling one group member had. I would almost have to say that the group member was slowly becoming a Implicit Yellow face because he no longer wanted to be seen as an asian who all he did was race and steal cars. He no longer wanted to be recognized as a dangerous person who everyone feared in Tokyo.

    Furthermore, the white guy named Ryan who moved to Tokyo because he was too much of liability in America was one of the only white people in Tokyo. He was seen as an outsider. Essentially, as time moved on and Ryan started to get more and more comfortable with living in Tokyo. He met one of the “bad group members” sister and fell for her almost instantly. Eventually the brother who was the leader of the bad Asian group became defensive because Ryan was an outsider and their beliefs were that no one gets involved with outsiders. This example demonstrated a act of Xenophobia, which means a hatred or fear of outsiders.

    I couldn’t help but analyze the situation and ask if that was a fear of an outsider or was he just being plain racist because he was a different ethnicity from them?

    Even though this movie portrayed the stereotype that most people believe about asians, my opinion is that every race has their niche. Whether you are white, black, asian or mexican; every race has their skill set and are known for something. Who cares if asians like to build cars up and race them, if thats what they love to do then great. Does it matter if black people like music or play sports? No, so my point is if you enjoy doing something then do it. Don’t let everyone else’s opinion determine your happiness.

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